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We all need a reset button sometimes. We all get trapped between our immediate concerns and the petty squabbles of the day. We fight with the people we care about over things so small we won't remember them in a few days, while the big stuff--compassion, peace, love--slips away from us without our even noticing. We become so busy that we can't see the beauty two feet in front of our faces.

I have always had a bit of a love-hate relationship with canned pickles. While I love them in theory--the taste of late summer in a jar--they usually fall far short of the crisp, briny platonic ideal, becoming increasingly soggy and insipid over time.

Emily Hilliard is the folklorist, writer, and baker behind the beautiful and inspiring pie blog Nothing in the House. Raised in Indiana, she's lived in the Midwest, New England, and the South, and currently resides in Washington, D.C. She holds an M.A.

Flour and water. That's all you'll need. Really.

I know, it's hard to have faith in just flour and water--those of us who bake bread have come to love the deus ex machina of instant yeast: its frothy upsurge and predictability. But wild yeasts are no slouches, and they are easily harnessed for bread making, as thousands of years of our ancestry would tell you.

After reading Ashley English's recently published book, A Year of Pies, not only was I inspired to...well...make more pie, I was compelled to contact her to write a guest blog.

I swore I wouldn't bombard you with yet another popsicle recipe for a while, but I'm having a hard time holding off.

Now that I've eaten my weight in berries this season, I've been looking for ways to use them in cooking projects. Of course, there are lots of creative ideas floating around out there, but sometimes simplicity and familiarity are in order--the sort of lackadaisical recipes that are perfect for summer vacations and lazy mornings.

Like most other avid cooks, I develop food crushes.

For a while, I put toasted cumin in almost everything. I kept a small bowl of it by the stove and would add a pinch here and a pinch there. It was a new (to me) flavor sensation, and I was testing its limits.

One thing about fruit: you never know exactly what you're going to get.

Back in high school, I ate no fewer than one orange a day. I liked oranges, as you might imagine, but under the guise of eating a snack, I was studiously applying my own less-than-rigid, pseudoscientific theories as to how to select a good orange.

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Joy of Cooking App for iPad and iPhone

After three years of collaborative effort with our friends at Culinate and Scribner, it is our pleasure to introduce the Joy of Cooking for iPad and iPhone! Please check out this full-featured, digital version of the 2006 edition. In addition to the recipes and indispensable reference information our readers know and love, the app has many features that are brand new to JOY:

  • Built-in recipe timers (you can have multiple timers going simultaneously)
  • Search for and filter recipes by key word, ingredient, cuisine, season, technique, diet, and more
  • Create shopping lists from within the app
  • Convert any recipe to metric automatically
  • Give voice commands or have recipe steps spoken to you
  • Create menus in the app
  • Share recipes from within the app
  • Color photography

Truly a JOY for the 21st century! Download by directing your browser to www.joyofcookingapp.com. Don't forget to review the app!