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I first made kombucha out of frugality. I was a student at the time and making $8 an hour on a goat farm. Fancy lacto-fermented beverages simply weren't in my budget. I scoured Craigslist for a kombucha mother (which now seems somewhat sketchy, I'll admit) and started making my own.

98-degree heat reminds us how unappealing turning on the stove can be… in an apartment… with no air conditioning. We can’t complain too much, since we’re on a low floor and do not get very much direct sunlight, but consumer-grade fans can only take you so far. Still, our current situation is much better than the poorly-ventilated apartment kitchen-closets of yesteryear.

There are plenty of food trends that I just can't get on board with. This is why you may never see me post a recipe for cupcakes on this site. It's not that a cupcake can't taste good. It's a matter of principle. I just don't want to perpetuate a really overdone, tired trend.

The first summer I worked on a goat farm was a scorcher.

North Carolina summers tend towards the hot and humid, but this summer in particular was punishing. The days were unrelenting and bright, sticky in that special way the South and Midwest are.  It gets humid enough so that sweating doesn't do you any good--nothing evaporates and you just end up being hot and wet.

As far as "authenticity" in food goes, I'm not much of a stickler.

There's a lot of bickering in the food community about what is authentic and what isn't when it comes to certain dishes. I personally dislike the term "authentic" to begin with. Authentic to whom? I think "typical" is a better word to use. As in, "typical southern cornbread does not contain sugar."

I am at my best in the kitchen when the fridge is near-empty and the pantry almost bare. It's like my own personal version of Chopped, except with no time limit and more pedestrian ingredients (and the judges tend to be a lot more forgiving!).

I had a high school English teacher who compared the subconscious mind to an attic. Or maybe it was a basement. I suppose it could even be a storage locker if you're not picky.

Is anyone else tired of being dessert-bombed?

You enjoy a pleasant meal, and then out comes a triple chocolate explosion or a maple-bacon extravaganza (just the word "extravaganza" makes me a little tired). You want dessert, but by the time the sugar-fest is over, your tastebuds are exhausted and you have the irrepressible urge to brush your teeth. Twice.

The past week has been a bit...distracting. I imagine developing an app is a bit like any big project in that, when you're finally done, you sit back, expecting to feel a warm and satisfied feeling of accomplishment. Maybe you envision a bottle of champagne or a nice dinner, or maybe your needs are much simpler and high-fives all around would be enough.

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Joy of Cooking App for iPad and iPhone

After three years of collaborative effort with our friends at Culinate and Scribner, it is our pleasure to introduce the Joy of Cooking for iPad and iPhone! Please check out this full-featured, digital version of the 2006 edition. In addition to the recipes and indispensable reference information our readers know and love, the app has many features that are brand new to JOY:

  • Built-in recipe timers (you can have multiple timers going simultaneously)
  • Search for and filter recipes by key word, ingredient, cuisine, season, technique, diet, and more
  • Create shopping lists from within the app
  • Convert any recipe to metric automatically
  • Give voice commands or have recipe steps spoken to you
  • Create menus in the app
  • Share recipes from within the app
  • Color photography

Truly a JOY for the 21st century! Download by directing your browser to www.joyofcookingapp.com. Don't forget to review the app!